What To Include In An Influencer Media Kit: 8 Critical Things

by admin

Every social media influencer needs a media kit. It gives brands much of the information that they need to further assess an influencer as a fit for their campaign as well as give them an idea of costs and different content packages that are available.

Use the list below as a checklist for your own media kit, whether you are creating your first influencer media kit or updating an existing one.

Good design
Your media kit needs to match the personal brand you are building as well as creating a positive and professional first impression on a brand when they open the document. Focus on colour scheme, images and layout to make sure that your influencer media kit needs to be easy to read and understand. Free tools like Canva provide high quality templates and design capabilities to get started on the right foot.

Short introduction about yourself
Before a brand reaches out to you they will only know you based on the information available on your social media or blog. It is important that you provide information about yourself. The more that you are able to share about yourself with the brand will help them to further align themselves with your audience.

Your contact details
It is likely that a brand will reach out to you by email, however, there are reasons why you need to provide them with other contact details. Brands will need your mailing address and potentially a phone number to ship their products to you. Including this information in your media kit saves them having to ask later on. It also shows that you are prepared to do business with them by proactively providing information they would need to ask for otherwise.

Audience demographics
You need to provide brands with detailed audience demographics and engagement rates. Where possible you can go beyond age and location. There are other statistics that are valuable for a brand in their decision making process. Audience interests, brand affinities, sponsored post performance, click through rates and more. Some of these will require a little math on your part and others you can access through tools like HypeAuditor.

Website statistics
If you have a website (or a blog), providing data on traffic, page views, average session time and anything else you have access to will pay dividends down the line. Sometimes brands might reach out because they noticed you on Instagram but if you media kit includes statistics for example, from your website/blog and a YouTube channel that might increase the value of the collaboration for you.

Testimonials/portfolio
Now it’s time to show off a bit by providing testimonials and portfolio samples from past brand collaborations. Where at all possible, include some of the data from that collaboration to show how you content performed. Of course, a few glowing reviews will help as well. Haven’t worked with any brands yet? That’s ok! You can include content that features products in it that weren’t sponsored so that the brand can get an idea of what you can do for them.

Collaboration options
Brands might have an idea of what they would like a collaboration with you to look like, however, in the event that they don’t or have some flexibility, showing them options of what it could look like can be very helpful. You can present options as content packages. These packages might not be exactly what your collaboration with the brand ends up being but it can help it take shape.

Pricing
You can avoid some of the back and forth with brands if you outline some basic pricing for the various options that you present to the brand. They will have an internal budget, however, if you can provide estimated rates that can be used to start the negotiation (yes, you can negotiate), you’ll be putting your best foot forward.